Corsi Nation

DrCorsi Banner

LearningEducationBanner

A Bad Report Card for Public Schools

Written by Education Lead
0
0
0
s2sdefault

 

brain 3446307 640Introduction

U.S. public schools have earned a bad report card…again. Multiple studies comparing test results of American students to those of many other nations show that the United States repeatedly falls short of making the top grades. It’s a problem that has been going on for years, inherent in the educational system itself, and some say it’s purposeful.

Drew Desilver at Per Research Center

As reported by Drew Desilver, the United States still lags behind many other nations in academics. Of 71 countries tested in 2015 via the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), the U.S. placed 24th in science, 38th in mathematics, and 24th in reading. For a country like ours, rich with opportunity, these results are disappointing.

Decoding the Truth About Common Core

Written by Education Lead
0
0
0
s2sdefault

CommonCore01

Editor's Note:  Decoding the Truth About Common Core was written by Ruth Sundeen, published by The Old Schoolhouse(R) magazine, and is used with permission.

 

They are asked to solve a math problem in ten steps instead of three; and they are asked how they “feel” about a math problem that involves no calculations.

Another homeschool mom had just asked me: “Do you know anything about Common Core?” I responded again: “No, not really.” Finally, I’d had enough. It was time to do my own research so I could give my support group and my friends some answers about Common Core. Common Core is in the public schools, Catholic parochial schools, and promises to walk in the front door of our homeschooling families—unless we as homeschooling parents wake up and get informed and involved.

Education In America Before The Education System

Written by Education Lead
0
0
0
s2sdefault

nelson familyEditor's Note: This post Education in America Before the Education System was originally published on Intellectual Takeout by Daniel Lattier and used with permission.

 

Before America’s public education system was created around 1840, the vast majority of Americans were illiterate and walked around with dirt on their faces.

At least, that seems to be the impression shared by most people today.

But it turns out that education, like nature, abhors a vacuum. In the decades after the American Revolution—much like the decades before, and most of human history—a number of different educational options existed that did not depend upon a centralized, bureaucratic system.